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Author Topic: Scouting and the Buckeye Trail  (Read 35687 times)
Poppie
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The Buckeye Trail Pie


« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2011, 11:27:27 AM »

How did Caesar's Creek get its name? If one were to momentarily go back in time, and collaborate with the ones who cleared and developed the lands, the story of a Negro slave called Caesar could possibly be the topic. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohwarren/Bogan/bogan330.htm 

Legend No. 1
It is written by one source that "Caesar" had escaped from his Southern owners and for years made the banks of Caesar's Creek his peaceful abode. One authority says, "It is not known whether he erected a rude cabin of logs to shield himself in foul weather, or occupied some cave in the Massie Township bluffs."

Legend No. 2
...an account of some horses being stolen from the whites, the blame being placed on the Shawnee Indians.
An army was subsequently raised (in 1786) by General Benjamin Logan, which traveled northwesterly by way of Kenton's Trace to destroy the Shawnee village at Old Chillicothe and its inhabitants. Our story goes that one of the officers had a slave with him named Caesar, who had learned of the plan, and also knew that Kenton's Trace led to the Shawnee Indian town.
When the army had quieted down, Caesar crept away, followed the trace, notified the Indians and fled with them.

Legend No. 3
Greene County asserts that the creek took its name from the Negro servant of one of the officers who commanded the expedition of "Gen. George Rogers Clark" against Old Chillicothe on the Little Miami in 1794.

Legend No. 4
Another report goes that when Simon Kenton was being held by the Shawnee Indians as a prisoner in Old Chillicothe, he wished to escape. Caesar privately told Kenton that he couldn't help him to escape, but he could tell him where his creek was.
Caesar supposedly told Kenton he could take his (Caesar's) stream to the Little Miami River and on to the Ohio and refuge.
Whether truth or fiction, this writer, while searching through the many sources regarding the Negro slave, Caesar, and the naming of Caesar's Creek, can say with all due respect, that grounds for substantiation "is in the eyes of the beholder."


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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
Poppie
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« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2011, 11:55:02 AM »

"Big Muskie" was once the World's Largest Earth Moving Machine. What remains today is a monstrous metal bucket, vaguely resembling a robot dog head. The bucket sits on a rise, overlooking the beautiful valley that it once mined and destroyed, which has been renamed "Re-Creation Land."

 Built in 1969, Big Muskie could move 39 million pounds of earth and rock every hour, revealing rich coal seams 100-150 feet down in southeastern Ohio. BM could swing its boom 600 feet, creeping across the landscape on four giant shoes. The immense dragline machine was churning along at full production until 1991, when power demands and other factors convinced the owners to shut down.
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/2184
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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
Poppie
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« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2011, 12:09:10 PM »

Among the first pioneers of the county, especially in the neighborhood of Somerset, were some German Catholic families. To Bishop Fenwick belongs the honor of being not only the missionary priest of Perry county but the very first to be settled in Ohio.
The famous old Stone Church in western Saltlick is, too, in a ruinous condition. The congregation dates
back to 1825. The building that is now falling to pieces was built in 1839. It was a magnificent struc- ture for its day and is one of the landmarks of southern Perry.  http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tfisher/mphchurches.htm
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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
Poppie
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« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2011, 12:13:26 PM »

Grandma Emma Gatewood was an Ohio farmers wife, mother of eleven children, grandmother of twenty three. She was the first woman to hike the 2,168-mile Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine solo. (The first is believed to have been Mildrid Ryder known as Peace Pilgrim) She did it in 1955 at the age of 67, wearing Keds sneakers and carrying an army blanket, a raincoat, a plastic shower curtain for shelter, a cup, first aid kit, raincoat, and one change of clothes, all of which she carried in a homemade bag slung over one shoulder. Her hiking diet consisted mainly of dried beef, cheese and nuts, supplemented by wild food she would find along the way.
 
http://www.trailtherapy.org/Grandma_Gatewood.html
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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
Poppie
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« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2011, 12:20:47 PM »

Serpent Mound is a spectacular effigy earthwork of a serpent uncoiling along a prominent ridgetop in northern Adams County, Ohio. From the tip of its nose to the end of its tail, the effigy is 1,348 feet long. When it was originally described, in 1848, the body of the serpent was five feet high and 30 feet wide.

Excavations between 1887 and 1889 by Frederic Putnam, of Harvard University's Peabody Museum, revealed the structure of the earthwork.  But Putnam did not find any artifacts that revealed the age or cultural affiliation of the mound. Until recently, archaeologists assumed that Serpent Mound was built by the Adena culture (800 B.C. to 100 A.D.) since two Adena burial mounds are located nearby. Yet Putnam also discovered traces of a village of the Fort Ancient culture (1000 A.D. to 1650 A.D.) near the Serpent. Excavations conducted in 1991 recovered charcoal that returned radiocarbon dates suggesting that the Fort Ancient people built the mound between about 1025 A.D. and 1215 A.D.. http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=2223
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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
Poppie
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« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2011, 12:30:08 PM »

In 1787, the new United States government passed the Northwest Ordinance, which established the Northwest Territory and made provisions for its organization and settlement. From that date, the future of the Native Americans was in question. Before settlement could proceed, the Native Americans had to be driven west. A number of expeditions failed, including one lead by General Martin Smith who marched along the Watershed Trail, widening it as he went so that his men and wagons could pass. Thus, the trail became Smith Road. In 1794, "Mad" Anthony Wayne finally subdued the Native Americans and the Treaty of Greenville moved them west of the Cuyahoga River.

The immediate threat of warfare between the white settlers and the native inhabitants of the Ohio Country had been reduced by Anthony Wayne’s victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in August 1794. A year later, the former contending forces gathered at Greenville (today in western Ohio) to sign a peace agreement.

Wayne represented the federal government and expressed his hope that the treaty would last “as long as the woods grow and the waters run.”

The natives were less enthusiastic, regarding the agreement as a forced treaty. They had little choice because of the whites’ advantages in arms and numbers. Tribes represented included the Miami, Chippewa, Wyandot, Shawnee, Pottawatomie, Kickapoo, Delaware, Wea, Piankashaw, Kaskaskia and Eel River.

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1016.html

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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
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« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2011, 04:12:01 PM »

I think this is part of a scouting project to get historical status for certain parts of the trail.
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Poppie
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« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2011, 09:35:29 PM »

The Buckeye Trail itself cannot be an historical trail.  There are too many owners, federal, state, county, local, private, etc.  However, a scout can use an historical site near the trail and the trail to earn the Historical Trails Award.  I have received confirmations from 4 of the 15 councils in Ohio.

I need your help in identifying historical information in the sections of the Buckeye Trail.  Please post any sites that you are familiar with.

I would, however, like to leave this topic with just historical sites.  You may post, but I would appreciate it if you remove non historical posts after a short period of time.  Please feel free to send me personal messages, I do want to hear your opinions.  This page will hopefully be changed to a direct link on the Buckeye Trail web page in the future.  I would like to thank the administrators of this page for the temporary use of the page.
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Departng Milford August 14, 2011
Pioneer Spirit
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« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2011, 12:04:29 PM »

A good portion of Ohio was visited by General Morgan.   He made a dramatic pass through Vinton County that year visiting havoc upon some of my ancestors.   

In addition, President Nixon’s ancestors are laid to rest in Mt Pleasant cemetery on the edge of where Vinton and Hocking counties join. 
Bricks made in Vinton County were used to build the Coca Cola building in Atlanta.  Iron from the furnaces was rumored to have been used in the union’s first iron clad ship in the Civil war.
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