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Author Topic: Scouting and the Buckeye Trail  (Read 14001 times)
Poppie
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The Buckeye Trail Pie


« on: May 22, 2011, 10:31:09 PM »

Listed Below are Historical Events that could be used to earn the Historical Trails Award.  Feel free to post an event for your section of the Buckeye Trail.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2011, 08:46:12 AM by Poppie » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2011, 09:12:31 PM »

Several attended a hike sponsored by the Harrison County Historical Society on Sunday November 14. The hike followed a section of Ohio’s Buckeye Trail along the shore of Piedmont Lake.
 The main objective of the hike was to reach the abandoned roadway that was the entry point to Harrison County by Morgan’s Raiders in July of 1863. A main item of interest along the trail was the former site of the Sea Scout’s land ship S.S.S. Hanna. Hike leader, Ray Ferrell (pictured talking to the hiking group), also a member of the Buckeye Trail Association, had camped at the scout base as a boy and pointed out the remnants of the rifle range, the activities board, the parking and camping areas, and the land ship’s iron mooring post. Afterwards everyone enjoyed some hot chocolate while making plans for the next hike, which will take place on November 28 at 1:30 p.m.
 The Buckeye Trail outing will be a moderate 4.2 mile hike starting at Thin Lane, near the old Tri-County fairground and end at State Route 22 in Piedmont. Call Ray Ferrell at 740-942-3475 for more information. More details can be found in the November 20 print edition of the Harrison News-Herald.Harrison News Herald — November 19, 2010 at 3:28 pm

 
« Last Edit: June 07, 2011, 08:10:27 AM by Buckeye » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2011, 09:22:16 PM »

In July 1863, Confederate General John Hunt Morgan led his "Morgan's Raiders" on the deepest incursion of Confederate troops into Union territory during the course of the Civil War. Funding has been secured to establish "Morgan's Trail", which will follow the route of Morgan's Raid from Tennessee to their capture in Columbiana County. The trail will follow the route of Morgan's Raiders as they passed through southern Harrison County. The troops entered the county near Smyrna and traveled east, passing through Piedmont, Moorefield, Stumptown, Georgetown, and Harrisville.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2011, 08:10:50 AM by Buckeye » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2011, 09:26:26 PM »

It is named for the first road that the early European settlers built from the Pennsylvania line to the new city of Cleveland in the early 1800s. A small path was cut first. Settlers knew that a larger road was needed, so they "girdled" the trees along the path. (Girdling a tree means cutting through the bark around the entire tree. This cuts off the flow of nutrients so the tree dies. Once a tree dies, it is much easier to remove it and thus widen the road.) Today the remaining section of Girdled Road is the northern boundary of this park.
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2011, 09:34:09 PM »

Inscription. On this site, the Miami and Erie Canal, that came north from Cincinnati and the Ohio River, intersected with the Wabash and Erie Canal that came from Fort Wayne and Evansville, Indiana. From this point, which became the town of Junction, the canals proceeded as one to Defiance, Toledo, and Lake Erie. From the 1830s to the 1870s, the canals played a key role in the settling of Paulding County, an area that was once part of the Great Black Swamp. They held the promise of easier and quicker passenger transportation and commodity shipping and Junction became a landmark for fugitive slaves escaping to Canada. Once a thriving and growing community, the village of Junction became a forgotten historical note with the passing of the canal era and the coming of the railroads. Today, the Buckeye Trail and North County Trail follow the canal path through Paulding County  http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=27250
The remains of lock 21 can be seen by going 2 miles south of Junction on Paulding County Road 163. The lock has a pull off area and is the site of a geo-cache box. Warning: The portion of the county road that has access to the lock is dirt road and cannot be traversed when wet. The site is also covered in poison ivy! BUT it is really worth the trip.
    — Submitted April 10, 2011, by Tanya S. Brunner of Evansport, Ohio
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2011, 10:04:49 PM »

Located near Peebles in Adams County, Ohio, Sodaville, which eventually became known as the Mineral Springs Health Resort, was a prominent resort community known for its mineral springs.
 
In 1840, local businessman Charles Matheny first began to promote the healthy qualities of the nearby mineral springs. Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, many people believed that mineral springs had special medicinal qualities. In 1864, investors completed a hotel near the springs and named the resort Sodaville. Eventually Sodaville became known as the Mineral Springs Health Resort. Due to the popularity of the resort, owner Smith Grimes constructed an additional hotel in 1904. The original hotel burned in 1924, and began the decline of the Mineral Springs Health Resort. In 1940, the resort closed.
http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=3006
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2011, 10:12:41 PM »

In the mid-nineteenth century, all four of the major transportation methods of the time came together in Tadmor, Ohio. For starters, the village sat on the banks of the Great Miami River a few miles north of Dayton. Then the Miami & Erie Canal came through on Tadmor's western edge. The National Road reached there in 1839 and the Dayton & Michigan Railroad rounded out things when it was completed in 1851. Only a couple of dozen people actually lived in Tadmor but a lot of people passed through along with plenty of freight. The river, railroad, and canal carried things north and south with the National Road being the sole east-west connection. http://www.dennygibson.com/oddment/tadmor/index.htm

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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2011, 10:24:01 PM »

Construction of dams in Ohio dates back to the early 1800's when reservoirs such as Buckeye Lake and Grand Lake St. Marys were built to supply water to the canal system, which provided a means of transportation for agricultural trade and commerce. Dam construction continued at a modest pace for about the next 100 years with relatively few dams built by private entities. In the early part of the 19th century, several large municipally-owned dams and reservoirs were built for public water supply. Severe floods also prompted the formation of Conservancy Districts which constructed dams for flood control. http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/tabid/3322/Default.aspx

 
Ohio has at least 50,000 lakes and ponds worthy of those names, with more than 2,000 that cover 5 acres or more. But not all are true lakes, or at least not true “natural” lakes that were here before settlers began building farm ponds, reservoirs and canals.
In fact, aside from Lake Erie, most of the well-known recreational lakes in Ohio—the water enjoyed most for boating, swimming and fishing—are definitely man-made. Virtually all are reservoirs, held back by dams and built for water supply or flood control where no lake existed before.
Many would be surprised to learn that less than three dozen of Ohio’s 50,000 lakes and ponds make the Cleveland Museum of Natural History’s list of “natural” lakes. Jim Bissell, the museum’s curator of botany, places the count at 33. He’s been helping compile a list since 1988. http://www.gcbl.org/water/lake-erie/ohios-other-lakes
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« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2011, 10:28:12 PM »

Akron, Ohio - Goodyear Airdock - Hangar
A huge structure .... Just imagine how big the blimps used to be that were built inside. As large as a Floating City! In the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest building without interior supports, the Goodyear Airdock -- where Goodyear once built blimps --- is 22 stories high and could accommodate four Super Bowl Games at once! Because of the unique design and construction, height and atmosphere actually produce rain and clouds inside the building! [Michael Schario, 06/16/2002]
Akron, Ohio - Goodyear Blimp - Zeppelin Dock
Worlds largest structure without interior support. Under right conditions it rains inside. Home of ill-fated Akron and Macon airships. [Ted Snyder, 09/23/2000]
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/6370
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« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2011, 11:08:21 PM »

 - Built in 1840 on Gift Ridge, Adams County, Ohio. Counterfeit $500 bills and 50 cent pieces were made here and distributed to Ohio River boats which received a light signal from the gable window. There are trick door locks, slots in doors where counterfeit plates were kept, chimneys L shaped with secret room lined with lead. Grounds have trails thru the woods and picnic area.
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« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2011, 08:09:37 AM »

Poppie, good stuff, but these are not events and should be posted under this area:

http://buckeyetrail.org/TrailTalk/index.php?board=29.0
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2011, 10:56:58 AM »

Built in the 1860's, this factory supplied ammunition and cannonballs for the Union Army during the Civil War. It has been abandoned since around the late 40s/early 50s. It is considered to be quite haunted, with many deaths of its workers in the past

Situated near King’s Island in the Mason area, Peter’s Cartridge was a supplier of munitions during the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II.  The building is crumbling, yet still in use in places.  Still, even with cars parked around it, mostly cyclists and hikers using the Little Miami Trail, it looks abandoned.
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« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2011, 11:01:42 AM »

History of the former railroad on Washington Street that was torn out this year. It started out as the Toledo, Delphos & Indianapolis, and after many name changes and mergers, ended with the most recent name being the Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railroad.

To get an idea of why there was such a rush to build narrow gauge railroads in the 1870's and early 1880's, we need to know that at that time there was mainly lumber industries, plus farm products and other businesses that needed a way to transport their goods to more markets, thus receiving a better price.

The railroads would reach big cities such as Toledo, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Cincinnati and many other areas. Also they would connect to other narrow-gauges that entered the coal fields and stone quarries of Ohio and Indiana. The Toledo, Delphos, & Indianapolis narrow gauge (three feet width) was estimated to cost $8,000 per mile, built and equipped, versus a standard gauge, (four feet, eight and one half inches width) at least three times that amount.  http://www.delphos-ohio.com/Holdgreve/narrowgauge_railroad.htm

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« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2011, 11:05:16 AM »

Once upon a time, Wood County was not a flat, windswept land of farms and fields. It was a dark, brooding morass of monstrous trees, bottomless mud holes, and fetid marshes crisscrossed by sand ridges, limestone outcroppings, and oak openings. Today, little to none of that virgin landscape remains, a testament to one of the largest public works projects undertaken by our young nation.

It all began when General Mad Anthony Wayne defeated a coalition of Indian forces at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794. The Indians were forced to cede their lands to the U.S. and move westward. Settlers quickly moved in and started making land claims. But the treacherous Great Black Swamp remained unsettled, owing to the fact that almost every person who traveled through the Swamp came out with tales of terror, dread, and despair.

http://www.bgfile.com/history/short/blackswamp/index.php
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« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2011, 11:15:15 AM »

When this meteorite collision occurred what it actually did was hit and skipped along the ground creating an almost bowl formation. that's why the edges of the "crater" are so visible. This is extremely fertile farm land and one of the cleanest steams in Ohio is in this crater. Brush Creek was evaluated recently by the EPA and they discovered that there is more water flowing into Brush Creek than is coming out.  the belief is cracks in the Earth-faults from the collision are allowing the water to seep in and actually create an underground river that re-appears just beyond the edge of the crater in this view and does so as a very turbulent whirlpool formation in the Creek!   http://www.aradias-garden.com/Cemetery-view-Of-Crater.html
Coesite (http://www.minerals.net/mineral/silicate/tecto/quartz/coesite.htm) is a Silicon dioxide.
Natural Coesite has been reported in the Barringer Crater (also known as Meteor Crater) in Coconino Co., Arizona; , Ohio; the Kentland crater, Newton Co., Indiana; the Riess-kessel Crater, Bavaria, Germany; Kimberly, South Africa; and the western coast of Namibia.
Coesite (center of inclusion) (http://www.geosci.unc.edu/Petunia/IgMetAtlas/minerals/coesite.html) and recrystallized quartz (borders of inclusion) form a tiny inclusion in nearly pure endmember pyrope garnet from the famous Dora Maira massif of Italy. The presence of coesite (a high-pressure polymorph of quartz) indicates that this rock saw extremly high pressures during metamorphism (probably more than 28 kbar).
Coesite (http://mineral.galleries.com/minerals/silicate/coesite/coesite.htm) was actually first synthesized in 1953 before the discovery at Meteor Crater.

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